Farm to Baby

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Dec 4

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday December 4th


Beauregard: These sweets were born in Long Island, but have a southern accent. Horticulturists at Louisiana State first bred this variety to be hardy, and Garden of Eve Organic Farm in Riverhead (on the North Fork) raises them to be delicious!

Harukei Turnips: Snow white and perfectly round, these tender young turnips are high in Vitamin C.
 
Bosc Pears: A cultivar first introduced in 1833 and much loved for its dense, fragrant and buttery flesh, Bosc is so highly esteemed that in some circles it’s known as the “aristocrat of pears.” 

Idareds: A cross between two old time New York apples, Jonathan and Wagener, Idared came out of Idaho in the 1940s. We roast and whip ours to incredible effect.

Toddler Meals

Sweet Potato Hash: Three kinds of sweet potatoes for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Put an egg on it. 
 
Sautéed Apples: Galas, skin-on for color and fiber. Rustic.
 
Carrot Stew: So good there’s a song about it.
 
Meatballs: Made from grass-fed and grain-free beef from Kinderhook Farms in the Hudson Valley. The health benefits of consuming truly pastured (as opposed to just USDA Organic) meats are many. Read more about them onKinderhook’s site.

Farm to Baby Menu - Friday November 30th

Farm to Baby Menu for November 30th



Beets: Betacyanin, the pigment that gives red beets their beautiful violet color, is a powerful antioxidant. Sweet and earthy, ours are steamed in order to retain maximum flavor and nutrition.
 
Bosc Pears: This variety of pear was first introduced in 1833 and is much loved for its dense, fragrant and buttery flesh. It’s held in such high esteem that in some circles it’s known as the “aristocrat of pears.” Well, la di da.
 
Butternut: Old, faithful butternut is a favorite winter squash prized for its dense, nutty flesh. It’s loaded with vitamins A, B, and C, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.
 
Cauliflower: Brassica is back, and as powerful as ever. All the members of the family pack a wollop of nutrition, and cauliflower is no exception. What’s more, it’s sweet, delicious and makes a beautiful snow white puree.
 

Toddler Meals

Braised Chicken: From Grass Land farm in Ovid, New York. 
  
Quinoa Porridge and Stewed Apples: Quinoa’s protein value is extremely high (14% by mass), and the protein it supplies is complete, meaning that it includes all nine essential amino acids. 
 
Lemony Roasted Cauliflower: Florets make another fine finger food. Here they benefit from the addition of a bit of fresh lemon zest and a dash of sunshine.
 
Vanilla Bean-Poached Pears: Full of fiber and phytonutrients, pears are perfect as they are. But what cannot be improved by the addition of vanilla bean? Warm these gently and serve at breakfast, lunch and dinner (and dessert)!

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday November 27th


Brussel Sprouts: A cultivar of wild cabbage first brought to the United States by French settlers, these edible buds are perhaps the best-loved member of the Brassica family (with kale poised to overtake them any day now). Brussel sprouts pack the nutritional punch you expect from a cruciferous veggie. Ours go down easy in this incredibly silky puree.
 
Bosc Pears: This variety of pear was first introduced in 1833 and is much loved for its dense, fragrant and buttery flesh. It’s held in such high esteem that in some circles it’s known as the “aristocrat of pears.” Well, la di da.
 
Crispin: Bright, light and floral, Crispin is proof of love at first bite. As always, we roast and whip our apples to perfection. 
 
Carrots: Aside from being the happiest color, orange is evidence of beta-carotene, the phytonutrient that gives carrots their gorgeous glow and tons of nutritional power.
 

Toddler Meals

Steel-Cut Oats and Roasted Pears: Baby, it’s cold outside. Keep warm with this nourishing and hearty porridge topped with roasted pears and maple. 
 
Cider-Braised Brisket and Polenta: Grass-fed and grain-free beef from Kinderhook Farms in the Hudson Valley. The health benefits of consuming truly pastured (as opposed to just USDA Organic) meats are many. Read more about them on Kinderhook’s site.
 
Cinnamon-Orange Apples: Diced Crispin apples make a great finger food at breakfast, lunch and dinner. 

Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Cranberries: Brussel sprouts pack the nutritional punch you expect from a cruciferous veggie, and fresh cranberries (from Jersey!) up the antioxidant ante. Nutritionally speaking, this dish knows no limit.
 
Chickpea Purée: Packed with protein, fiber, and good fat (from monounsaturated extra virgin olive oil) this mild, creamy purée is smooth and luscious, but still has plenty of texture. Dollop onto some whole wheat Oh’s and you have baby crostini!

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday November 20th


Sweet Peas: Can something so small contain everything verdant and bright? Shelled by hand and then very lightly blanched to preserve nutritional content, our peas are brimming with B-vitamins, iron and protein. From Norwich Meadows.

Old Henry: A white-skinned sweet potato with creamy, golden flesh, Old Henry is less fibrous than more common sweet potatoes, and it cooks up beautifully with an almost pudding-like texture and consistency. Vitamin A abounds.
  
Kabocha Squash: The kabocha, or Japanese pumpkin, is a favorite for its mild, sweet flavor and finely grained flesh. Kabocha boasts an excellent nutritional profile: alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, Vitamin C and the antioxidant mineral manganese are all present in good amounts. 
 
Crispin: Bright, light and floral, Crispin is proof of love at first bite. As always, we roast and whip our apples to perfection. 
 

Toddler Meals

Sweet Potato Hash: Three kinds of sweet potatoes for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Put an egg on it. 
 
Braised Chicken, Fennel and Sage: Tender bronze fennel finds a friend in fowl. Say it five times fast. 
 
Fresh Lima Beans: Fordhooks are the finest and largest of the limas (or butterbeans, if you were raised in the South). Shelled by hand, these plump little beans boast a fresh, buttery flavor and are a good source of protein, Vitamin C and manganese. 

Quinoa Carrot Bread: Quinoa’s protein value is extremely high (14% by mass), and the protein it supplies is complete, meaning that it includes all nine essential amino acids. 
 
Baked Apples: Whole Lady apples baked until soft would not be sad if you warmed them gently and introduced them to vanilla ice cream. 
 
Cranberry Curd Tartlet: Fresh cranberries cooked down with maple, vanilla and warm spices top a crust of whole rolled oats.

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday November 13th


Harukei Turnips: Snow white and perfectly round, these tender young turnips are high in Vitamin C.
 
Sweet Peas: Can something so small contain everything verdant and bright? Shelled by hand and then very lightly blanched to preserve nutritional content, our peas are brimming with B-vitamins, iron and protein. From Norwich Meadows.
 
McIntosh: One of the great North American apple varieties, McIntosh came out of the St. Lawrence River Valley in Ontario almost 200 years ago. Joe and Rhonda O’Brien grow these in Ulster County, and we turn them into awesomesauce in Brooklyn.
 
Golden Beets: An heirloom variety that’s, sweet, mild and (bonus!) won’t stain cheeks.
 

Toddler Meals

Butternut Squash Muffins: We’ve added snacks to our menus! Whole wheat muffins bolstered by butternut squash and sweetened with our own applepurée. Sign up by dropping us a line or logging into your account. Tiny delicious! 

Spelt Porridge with Spiced Pears: Spelt is an ancient grain that offers a broader spectrum of nutrients compared to many of its more inbred cousins in the wheat family. Better yet, it doesn’t seem to cause sensitivities in many people who are intolerant of wheat. 
 
Turkey Meatballs and Cranberry Compote: These miniature meatballs are for tiny fingers. Cranberry compote, sweetened with our own apple puree and spiced with cinnamon and black pepper, makes a dandy dipping sauce. With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we simply couldn’t resist. 
 
Cranberry Beans and Black Kale: Fresh cranberry beans, shelled by hand, with roasted garlic and the darling of the brassica family, kale. A happy twist on classic beans ‘n’ greens. 
 
Parsnips and Sweet Potato Mash: In the potassium department, parsnips put bananas to shame. Sweet potatoes sweep the carotenoid category. A side dish of winning and AWESOME!
 
Brussel Sprouts and Apples: Sauteéd Gala apples from Ulster County atop halved, roasted brussel sprouts from Long Island. Because it’s autumn in New York
Nov 9

Farm to Baby Menu - Friday November 9th


Parsnips: An intensely sweet tuber touting even more nutrients than its cousin the carrot. In the potassium department, it puts bananas to shame.
 
Idareds: A cross between two old time New York apples, Jonathan and Wagener, Idared came out of Idaho in the 1940s. We roast and whip ours to incredible effect.
 
Beets: Betacyanin, the pigment that gives red beets their beautiful violet color, is a powerful antioxidant. Sweet and earthy, ours are steamed in order to retain maximum flavor and nutrition.
 
Long Island Cheese Squash: This New York native is a favorite for its mild, sweet flavor and finely grained flesh. Long Island cheese squash boasts an excellent nutritional profile: alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, Vitamin C and the antioxidant mineral manganese are all present in good amounts. 
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

Apple-Quinoa Pancakes: Good morning, Morning! Hello, Sunshine! Protein-packed quinoa and grated Idared apples make breakfast as nutritious as it is delicious.
 
Braised Beef Shank and Cabbage: Grass-fed beef, braised with root vegetables and served atop browned cabbage, makes a hearty dinner on a cold autumn night. 
 
Black Beans and Heirloom Squash: Our meatless protein option for today pairs slow-cooked black beans with sweet, roasted winter squash. 
 
Sweet Potato Homefries: Roasted skin-on sweet potato wedges are perfect for the picking up. Grab, gum and mash. Here’s to fine motor skills.
 
Spiced Pears: Bosc pear halves poached with whole cloves, allspice, vanilla bean and maple. For breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert!
 
Nov 6

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday November 6th

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Romanesco: An edible flower from outer space, well, actually, Italy. Cousin to cabbage, but far more striking, romanesco is rich in carotenoids and vitamins C and K. 
 
Celeriac:  AKA celery root, knob celery or turnip-rooted celery, celeriac developed from the same wild species as did the stalk celery more often seen today. Its mild flavor lies somewhere between that of celery and parsley, and it’s packed with Vitamin K.
 
Cameo Apples: Prized for its sweet-tart flesh, Cameo is a descendant of the better known Red Delicious. Can you see the family resemblance? Cameos are great eaten out of hand, but we find that they roast beautifully and make an exceptional puree.
 
Carrots: Aside from being the happiest color, orange is evidence of beta-carotene, the phytonutrient that gives carrots their gorgeous glow and tons of nutritional power.
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

image

Baked Apples: Whole Cameo apples baked until soft would not be sad if you warmed them gently and introduced them to vanilla ice cream. 
 
Cauliflower Soup: Roasted cauliflower and fresh ginger make a hearty, warming soup perfect for a chilly autumn night.
 
Braised Chicken and Brown Rice: Tender, slow-cooked chicken, carrots and super nutritious whole grain brown rice. Pretty close to comfort food.
 
Oatmeal with Cranberries: Whole grain oats topped with stewed cranberries. 

Nov 2

Farm to Baby Menu - Friday November 2nd


Green Beans: Nutritional overachievers, these legumes are a good source of protein, B-vitamins, calcium and iron. 
 
Idareds: A cross between two old time New York apples, Jonathan and Wagener, Idared came out of Idaho in the 1940s. We roast and whip ours to incredible effect.
 
Sweet Potatoes: Perhaps the world’s best-loved tuber, the sweet potato is in fact botanically distinct from the yam. It’s also packed with antioxidants and Vitamin A. Yahtzee!
 
Bosc Pears: This variety of pear was first introduced in 1833 and is much loved for its dense, fragrant and buttery flesh. It’s held in such high esteem that in some circles it’s known as the “aristocrat of pears.” Well, la di da.
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Smoked Paprika: Cubed, roasted sweet potatoes are perfect for grasping and gumming. If you’re feeling really fancy, you can use a fork. 
 
Emmer Porridge and Spiced Apples: Emmer, an ancient grain high in protein, makes a hearty breakfast on these crisp fall mornings.
 
Snap Beans and Roasted Tomatoes: Yellow and green snap beans are sauteed in olive oil, then tossed with roasted tomatoes and toasted garlic chips. 
 
Cider-Braised Brisket and Polenta: Grass-fed and grain-free beef from Kinderhook Farms in the Hudson Valley.The health benefits of consuming truly pastured (as opposed to just USDA Organic) meats are many. Read more about them on Kinderhook’s site.

Farm to Baby Menu - Friday October 26th


 
Green Beans: Nutritional overachievers, these legumes are a good source of protein, B-vitamins, calcium and iron. 
 
Northern Spy: Native to the Northeast, with a juicy, aromatic and low-acid flesh. Noted for its high Vitamin C content. Grown by Breezy Hill Orchards, a family farm in the Hudson Valley in operation since 1949.
 
Casper: An heirloom winter squash with so much Vitamin C, it’s scary
 
Beets: Betacyanin, the pigment that gives red beets their beautiful violet color, is a powerful antioxidant. Sweet and earthy, ours are steamed in order to retain maximum flavor and nutrition.
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

Savoy Cabbage: Part of the brassica family, which also includes kale and broccoli, this nutritional powerhouse is the sweetest and most tender of the cabbages. It has its crinkled emerald leaves to thank for its striking good looks, and we have W. Rogowski farm to thank for it.
 
Braised Chicken: From Grass Land farm in Ovid, New York. 
 
Roasted Apples: Northern Spies, roasted skin-on for color and fiber. Rustic.
 
Quinoa Porridge and Stewed Pears: Quinoa’s protein value is extremely high (14% by mass), and the protein it supplies is complete, meaning that it includes all nine essential amino acids. 

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday October 23rd

 
Green Beans: Nutritional overachievers, these legumes are a good source of protein, B-vitamins, calcium and iron. 
 
Red Beauty Apples: Grown by Joe O’Brien in Ulster county, these beauties originated near Rome Township, Ohio in the early part of the 19th century. Great cooking apples, here roasted and whipped, they prove that beauty is more than skin deep.
 
Sweet Potatoes: Domesticated some 5,000 years ago, the sweet potato is in fact botanically distinct from the yam. One of the world’s best loved tubers, it’s packed with antioxidants and Vitamin A abounds.
 
Bosc Pears: This variety of pear was first introduced in 1833 and is much loved for its dense, fragrant and buttery flesh. It’s held in such high esteem that in some circles it’s known as the “aristocrat of pears.” Well, la di da.
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:



Butternut Squash Barlotto: Nutrient-dense barley makes friends with old, faithful butternut. Rosemary lends a hand.
 
String Bean Fries: Pan-roasted to impart a toasty crunch, these are snackable like a french fry, but actually nutritious like the legumes that they are. We added some fresh ginger for extra fun and flavor.
 
Sweet Potato Latkes: What do you get when you sub super-nutritious sweet potatoes for ho-hum Idahos? Breakfast! These are not your bubby’s latkes. 
 
Scarlett Pears: Poached with maple, cinnamon, bay, beets (what? yes.) and black pepper. For fall.

Farm to Baby Menu - Friday October 19th

 
Spartan: A chip off the old block, Spartan’s the child of noble McIntosh. (Its rosy blush and snow-white flesh belie its lineage.) Ours are lightly roasted and then whipped. 
 
Zucchini: Cousin to cucumber, Italian in name, but native to North America, this classic squash contains folate, potassium, vitamin A  and magnesium.
 
Golden Ball Turnips: A tap root to change your mind about turnips. This particular cultivar is sweet, mellow and buttery. Swear it. You’ll see. 
 
Sugar Pumpkin: This is the sort of pumpkin meant for pies. Its bright orange flesh is a dead giveaway that it’s loaded with ever-important beta-carotene. If you start stock-piling now, you won’t have to use the canned stuff at Thanksgiving. (But seriously, we’ll make you a big batch for use on Turkey Day. Call us!)
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

Buckwheat Porridge with Quince: High in flavonoids and jam-packed with magnesium, buckwheat is a proven winner. Quince is a finely grained, aromatic member of the rose family that’s pretty good at upstaging apples. Good morning!
 
Barlotto with Root Vegetables and Grass-Fed Beef: An ancient grain, barley is high in both soluble (helps the body metabolize fats, lowers cholesterol) and insoluble fiber (promotes a healthy digestive tract). Grass-fed, grain-free beef from Kinderhook.
 
Whole Poached Seckel Pears: Seckel is the smallest of all pears. We’ve poached these with Vermont maple. Tiny delicious!
 
Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Cranberries: Brussel sprouts pack the nutritional punch you expect from a cruciferous veggie, and the fresh cranberries (from Jersey!) up the antioxidant ante. Nutritionally speaking, this dish knows no limit.

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday October 16th


 
Green Beans: Nutritional overachievers, these legumes are a good source of protein, B-vitamins, calcium and iron. 
 
McIntosh: One of the great North American apple varieties, McIntosh came out of the St. Lawrence River Valley in Ontario almost 200 years ago. Joe and Rhonda O’Brien grow these in Ulster County, and we turn them into awesomesauce in Brooklyn.
 
Bartlett: Known as Williams everywhere else in the world, Bartlett arrived stateside in 1799 by way of Berkshire (Aldermaston, to be precise).

Carrots: Aside from being the happiest color, orange is evidence of beta-carotene, the phytonutrient that gives carrots their gorgeous glow and tons of nutritional power.
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

Buckwheat Pancakes: High in flavonoids and jam-packed with magnesium buckwheat is a proven winner. These lacy silver dollar pancakes are easy to hold, and perfect for dipping. Take a short stack along to the park for snack time.
 
Spiced Pear and Apple Compote: Roasted pears and apples with warm spices and a touch of Vermont maple. For your pancakes!
 
Black Bean Hummus: We cook our beans low and slow to ensure the best texture and maximum digestibility. Replete with iron, B-vitamins and healthy fats (thanks, extra virgin olive oil), it’s spreadable, spoonable and dandy for dipping.
 
Cumin-Lime Carrot Spears: Roasted carrots spears with cumin and fresh lime zest. Perfect for the picking up and meant to pair with the black beans.

Farm to Baby Menu - Friday October 12th


Golden Girls: No, not those Golden Girls. We’re talking about Cucurbita pepo. Half-sister to zucchini, this straight-necked summer squash has a creamy white flesh and sunny complexion. It’s packed with the antioxidant lutein, which is thought to keep the eyes healthy. Here’s looking at you.

Broccoli: Nutritionally speaking, these edible flowers put most other veggies to shame. 

Sweet Potatoes: Domesticated some 5,000 years ago, the sweet potato is in fact botanically distinct from the yam. One of the world’s best loved tubers, it’s packed with antioxidants and Vitamin A abounds.
 
Crispin: Bright, light and floral, Crispin is proof of love at first bite. As always, we roast and whip our apples to perfection. 
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

 
Steel-Cut Oats and Roasted Pears: It’s going to get down into the 40s this weekend. Keep warm with this nourishing and hearty porridge of whole grain oats and roasted pears. 
 
Root Vegetable Caponata: Butternut squash (big time Vitamin A) and celery root (Vitamin K for strong bones) pack a major nutritional wallop, served up with a side of delicious.
 
Sweet Potato and Parsnip Smash: Roasted with rosemary and mashed by hand. Smashing, baby.
 
Chicken Cacciatore and Polenta: More Italian influence from the newest member of our team, Alex Saggiomo. Che Buono!

Oct 5

Farm to Baby Menu - Friday October 5th


Green Beans: Nutritional overachievers, these legumes are a good source of protein, B-vitamins, calcium and iron. 
 
Sweet Potatoes: Domesticated some 5,000 years ago, the sweet potato is in fact botanically distinct from the yam. One of the world’s best loved tubers, it’s packed with antioxidants and Vitamin A abounds.
 
Parsnips: An intensely sweet tuber touting even more nutrients than its cousin the carrot. In the potassium department, it puts bananas to shame.
 
Bosc Pears: This variety of pear was first introduced in 1833 and is much loved for its dense, fragrant and buttery flesh. It’s held in such high esteem that in some circles it’s known as the “aristocrat of pears.” Well, la di da.
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:

 
Steel-Cut Oats and Roasted Pears: It’s going to get down into the 40s this weekend. Keep warm with this nourishing and hearty porridge of whole grain oats and roasted pears. 
 
Alex’s Nonna’s Meatballs: Made from grass-fed and grain-free beef from Kinderhook Farms in the Hudson Valley. Many thanks to Aurelia Starrentino for passing her old-country recipe down to her great-grandson Alex, the newest addition to the Farm to Baby kitchen. Alex comes to us from California where he spent time getting awesome at CIA Greystone. More on him later! The health benefits of consuming truly pastured (as opposed to just USDA Organic) meats are many. Read more about them on Kinderhook’s site.

Baked Sweet Potato Fries: Maple syrup helps these brown nicely in the oven. Smoked paprika lends an undernote of campfire. Awesomeness in full effect. 
 
Herbed White Bean Ragout: For breakfast, lunch and dinner, a decadent ragout. Put an egg on it!

Oct 2

Farm to Baby Menu - Tuesday October 2nd

 
Carnival: Dressed for fall in a variegated suit of orange, green and gold, Carnival is a cross between Sweet Dumpling and an Acorn variety. When roasted, its fine, fragrant and mild flesh makes the smoothest puree. Load up on vitamins A, B, and C, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.
 
Celeriac: Aka celery root, knob celery or turnip-rooted celery, celeriac descended from the same wild species as did the stalk celery more often seen today. Its mild flavor lies somewhere between that of celery and parsley, and it’s packed with Vitamin K (for strong bones!)
 
Crispin: Bright, light and floral, Crispin is proof of love at first bite. Roasted and whipped, decidedly not applesauce.  
 
Bluebird Plums: A darling little heirloom plum with so much to offer. Vitamins, minerals and antioxidants abound.
 

Have you heard about Farm to Toddler?  
Here’s what’s on the menu today:


 

Maple-Braised Apples with Sage: Sweet, savory and versatile, these apples can be stand alone as a snack or round out breakfast. Serving alongside a rich, roasted or braised meat is also advisable. 
 
Barley Porridge with Roasted Plums and Ginger: A hearty whole-grain porridge topped with roasted plums. Ode to the morning
 
Butterbeans and Braised Radishes: Fordhooks are the finest and largest of the limas (or butterbeans, if you were raised in the South). Jersey Fresh from the great farmers at Great Road Farm and shelled by hand, these plump little beans boast a fresh, buttery flavor and are a good source of protein, Vitamin C and manganese. When braised, radishes lose their bite and give way to something tender and mellow. Fresh lemon zest and torn mint brighten things up a bit. 
 
Sauteed Winter Squash and Tatsoi: A member of the Brassica family, tatsoi is a Chinese cousin of kale and has all of the same nutritional superpowers. Carnival squash sweetens the deal.